Pets can’t Add, but they can Multiply! Bubbles and Bailey won’t be

Tiny Bailey upon arrival

Tiny Bailey upon arrival

Bubbles and Bailey came to us when they were tiny, only about 7 weeks old. A good Samaritan saved them after he found them under a car at a busy car park in Nairobi. They were in danger of being driven over and were nearly drowning after a major downpour, so the kind rescuer contacted TNR Trust.

They both underwent a check-up at the vet and went to a foster home. Here they were able to socialize with other dogs, cats, humans and received some basic training.

Having fun at the foster home

Having fun at the foster home

Bailey would often sneak away when other dogs were playing to find a quiet spot

Bailey would often sneak away when other dogs were playing to find a quiet spot

Bailey liked doing her own thing but also loved sitting in our volunteers’ laps. We found her a lovely new family and, when they picked up Bailey (now called AMBO) to take her home, we were told that from that night, she will sleeping in the same room as their daughter Grace, who insisted on this arrangement!

Bailey growing up to be a beautiful lady at her new loving home

Bailey growing up to be a beautiful lady at her new loving home

Bailey’s sister Bubbles also got adopted. They will both be spayed once they are old enough. ALL TNR adopters commit to this condition (spaying/neutering) as part of our aim to reduce the cat and dog population humanely.

Aside from the above reason, there are many benefits to spaying/neutering:

  • Increases community health by:

* Reducing the risk of rabies
* Reducing the risk of dog bites
* Ensuring a small and manageable, healthy animal population

  • Reduces the likelihood of uterine, ovarian and testicular cancer
  • Female health and longevity due to reduced physical stress from over breeding
  • Decrease in malnourished puppies and kittens
  • Spaying and neutering decreases aggressive behaviour in pets. Dogs become calmer and less likely to bite, attack or have fights
  • Spaying also ends the heat or ‘season’ cycle in females. For both species it eliminates the drive to reproduce and decreases the likelihood of your pet wandering away. Heat cycles in dogs are usually twice a year and may result in many unwanted behaviour changes including possible aggression

For more information, click HERE for the TNR Flyer on “Neutering your Pet: Pets can’t Add but they can Multiply!”

 

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