VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!

Okay supporters – we need you BIG TIME!

VOLUNTEERS needed urgently!

Fundraising (NO funds NO clinic!)

Five volunteers who are needed immediately :

You will be the DRIVER of our Trust’s success! We want super excited and committed people for this area. Attributes required:

  1. Super self driven/ able to work independently
  2. Have a min. of 8 hours per week available for the Trust throughout the period
  3. Can commit fully for at least one year (holidays are allowed :))
  4. Subscribes to  ‘commitment to time, promises made, deadlines and punctuality
  5. Team spirit and cooperation
  6. Highly skilled in talking with people, timely reporting and feedback
  7. Preferred (proven) experience/success in at least one of these fields: marketing, sales, communication, fundraising, event organising

Kindly fill the form TNR Trust Volunteer application form and send to admin@tnrtrust.org THIS WEEK. For more info, call Carla 0733739708.

Img 1EDUCATION for adults and children (rabies and dog bite prevention, animal welfare/husbandry)

Four volunteers needed to create and /or expand
the design of these programs

These programs are fun, informative and will be used at Mobile Clinic days, schools and adult forums.

The designs should be done within 2 weeks. Further improvements over time. We need a head of the group.

  1. Super self driven/ able to work independently
  2. Have a min. of 8 hours per week available for the Trust for the two weeks
  3. Can commit fully for at least six months ( holidays are allowed :))
  4. Subscribes to  ‘commitment to time, promises made, deadlines and punctuality
  5. Team spirit and cooperation
  6. Highly skilled in talking with people, timely reporting and feedback
  7. Preferred (proven) experience/success in at least one of these fields: education (teachers/life coaches), marketing, sales, communication, research
  8. We need one person who can make the displays – graphic Designer/Illustrator/Advertising person

Kindly fill the form TNR Trust Volunteer application form and send to admin@tnrtrust.org THIS WEEK. For more info, call Carla 0733739708.

TNR Volunteer: KARANJA

We are so lucky to have dedicated volunteers who help socializing and healing our fosters. We asked several of them what motivates them.

Karanja, a university graduate, is up first:

Why do you volunteer with foster dogs?

Karanja: “I have always loved dogs. As I was inbetween jobs I didn’t want to be idle and giving my time to the fosters seemed a worthwhile pastime.” 

What do you “take home” from volunteering?

Karanja: “Patience. I used to give up easily if something didn’t work immediately. Malaika  (the white dog) who was very scared after a bad accident and amputation took 3 months before we could put a collar on. Sitting beside her and slowly gaining her trust taught this patience. It makes a difference in my interaction with people now too.”

What difference does your volunteering make to the dogs?

Karanja: “Wow! Where do I start, I can answer this question by using Malaika, one of my favorites.  When I came in the first day there was a sign on Malaika’s kennel which said: “she bites, don’t touch, no eye contact”. After learning how to get her socialised, it became clear that she has a beautiful personality. I mean, she has come from far: from not touching her to touching her nose only, to legs to petting her all over. I feel proud to have played a part in this major achievement. 

My volunteering I believe, makes a big difference to the dogs, because I’ve seen most of them make huge strides to being happy and adoptable. The training and well programmed instructions we follow has also been one of the other contributing factors to the success.

And what difference does your volunteering make to you?

As I learn and understand much about their behaviours, I get to understand myself even better and this makes me a better volunteer to the doggies every day.

How do you become a TNR Trust Volunteer?

If you are interested in becoming a volunteer, there are multiple areas at TNR Trust where we depend on the help of volunteers, which you can find HERE. Become a volunteer and make a difference! 

Sasha: Before, during and now! A brave and gentle lady up for adoption

Sasha had been tied up with a very short leash to a tree. She had been left for days without food or water and her owner was not interested in her well-being. She was just an inch away from Death’s Door.

After a few weeks, Sasha went to a lovely foster family TNR Trust was able to find for her. We ensured she had access to a good shelter and environment so that she could get an immune system boost from being in the sun, sniffing around in the garden and doing some gently walks with a family that already had experience owning dogs. Sasha had to go through a lot of physical but also mental healing. 

 

The above shows the incredible road to recovery this strong but gentle lady had to walk. Malnourishment, ticks, fleas and neglect did not stop her from becoming a fantastic dog.

Below are some of the great character traits which make her a perfect candidate for being your new dog:

  • Born January 2017
  • Very calm and loves attention.
  • She is looking for a forever, loving and permanent home.
  • She would be much more confident and play more in a family that has a dog.
  • She is good with cats and approved for family with 8 Years & older children.

 

Interested? Please email admin@tnrtrust.org to adopt the wonderful Sasha!

REFERENCES:

TNR Trust Emergency: When we found Sasha

Sasha: back from the brink of death

Volunteering with TNR Trust: Kennel-hands

Kennel Hand Volunteers are essential for TNR Trust to provide a safe and secure home for our dogs at our kennels in Nairobi. We are always looking for volunteers to support our trust and provide the help we need to give our animals the care they need.

As a volunteer, you will make a huge difference to the lives of the dogs that come into TNR Trust. It can often take time for dogs to settle in when they first come to us, and our volunteers play an essential role in helping our dogs adapt to their new environment.

It is an excellent opportunity to gain practical knowledge of animal behavior and training, and a chance to apply, learn and expand a wide range of skills.

More information on Kennel Hand Volunteering: click HERE for our flyer.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Trap, Neuter and Release: What we do

!! WARNING !!

GRAPHIC CONTENT


TNR stands for “TRAP, NEUTER AND RELEASE”

All dogs and cats that go through our hands get trapped, receive vet care, vaccinations, get spayed/neutered and (if possible) they are released again in the same area.

If Release is not possible, TNR Trust looks for a new home for the dog/cat. But in Nyeupe’s case, this was not necessary.

Nyeupe was hanging around a guard house in Thome Estate, Nairobi. One of our volunteers noticed that she was walking around with a pretty nasty wound as she was apparently hit by a car.

After getting a check-up, a thorough clean and confining her to a kennel for a while to give her some rest, she started recovering nicely.  But we were not out of the woods yet: the vet also discovered she had a melanoma (skin cancer) on her stomach. It kept bleeding so the vet had to remove it. She was in a kennel at the vet for 7 weeks and her operation to remove the melanoma was expensive, so we ended up with quite a high vet bill. 

TNR Trust aims for Community Health through Animal Welfare, and we work towards this goal 1 dog (or cat) at a time. THIS IS ONLY POSSIBLE BY DONATIONS FROM THE PUBLIC as we do not receive government funding. So if you support our cause and you wish for more dogs like Nyeupe to be able to lead a healthy life, please check out how you can support or help TNR Trust by clicking HERE.

If it is just a question or you know of a dog/cat in distress, you can always email us on admin@tnrtrust.org or contact us through the Facebook page and we will ensure that we get back to you as soon as possible.

Note that when a caller notifies us about an animal in distress and that caller can help in some way it, it make it so much easier for us to be able to assist the caller. When people tell TNR Trust the area where the animals are, we then need to see how and if we can help as we rely 100 % on volunteers

And last but not least, what happened to Nyeupe?

We were finally able to release her back home at her gate in Thome Estate. Her son wasn’t sure how to react now that mum had come home!

IMG-20180609-WA0027

 

 

 

TNR Volunteering: Happy House Visit

Remember Millie? (Click HERE for Millie’s story) Millie came from a litter of 4 pups. Together with mother, her sister and 2 brothers, she was rescued by a film crew in Limuru (Kenya).

Milly, Billy and Emma: triple sibling trouble
Milly, Billy and Emma: triple sibling trouble
Lovely Millie as a pup
Lovely Millie as a pup

Millie now listens to the name “Jackie”. And Jackie is happy with her new adoption family and forever home. And who ever said dogs and cats can never get along!?

Some of our volunteers do house visits after an animal gets adopted through TNR Trust. We perform this extra service a few weeks after the adoption to make sure that the animal and his/her new family are compatible and that the animal has settled in well.

If you are thinking of becoming a TNR Trust Volunteer, there are various areas in which you can help us out. Please go to: https://tnrtrust.org/become-a-volunteer/

Another wonderful “FAILED FOSTERS”

Chebet came to us through KSPCA. She was known to the KSPCA Staff as “Kadogo” (little one). She was in a large kennel with lots of other dogs and was pushed to the back by the other bigger dogs. But she called to us with a very cute “Rrrrruuuuw” (howl/bark) she produced.

Chebet was extremely excited sitting in a car. She spent most of it looking out of the windows
Chebet was extremely excited sitting in a car. She spent most of it looking out of the windows

She quickly bonded with our volunteers and loved the attention. She was very active and loved exploring, including sniffing all the dogs and cats bums (much to the cats’ displeasure). She immediately jumped into our car and spent most of the drive to her new foster home looking out of the windows and trying to connect with Farah, who was in a crate next to her.

20180208 Chebet 10 adj

Chebet settled in well into her foster family. Volunteering as a TNR foster family is a great alternative for many expat families who love dogs (or cats) but whose circumstances are not entirely stable enough to adopt one.

For example:

  • Families who don’t if they will have enough living space at their next post
  • Families who cannot afford transporting their pets abroad
  • Families who are only here for a short period of time

But sometimes, the most wonderful thing happens, and that is when we have “Failed Fosters”. A dog (or cat) would go to their foster family and win over the hearts of the members of the family. This was the case for Chebet. At the foster family, she learned how not to be so bossy as they had a big Ridgeback who would put her in her place.

But they got along splendidly, and eventually we got a message from the foster parents saying that Chebet (now renamed DOBBIE) was to become a permanent member of their household. And as we all know: more often than we think, the dog choses its owner, not the other way around 🙂

20180312-Chebet foster

TNR Trust is always looking for foster families so we can help rehome more dogs (and cats) that cannot be released again at the place where they came from. If you chose to become a foster family, the TNR Trust community of volunteers will give you as much support as possible.

If you would like to know more about volunteering as a foster family, please click HERE.