TNR Trust

!! PUPPY PICTURES!! Tiggy and pups – up for adoption

TNR stands for “TRAP, NEUTER AND RELEASE”

All dogs and cats that go through our hands get trapped, receive vet care, vaccinations, get spayed/neutered and (if possible) they are released again in the same area.

If Release is not possible, TNR Trust looks for a new home for the dog/cat. In Tiggy’s case, the release part was not possible as she did not have a home to call her own PLUS she had 9 pups to raise !!

Tiggy and her little ones are currently staying with a TNR Foster Family, where they get plenty of opportunity to socialize with people, children and learn how to be dogs.

The below are pictures from the “Puppy Snuggling Party” the Foster Family had organized. We hope this will lead to the little puppers being adopted quickly!

 

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Tiggy's Puppies - 145

Tiggy's Puppies - 146

 

 

Teensy-Weensy Dudu can fit in your apartment!

Dudu is yet another KSPCA – TNR TRUST collaboration: she was found as a scrawny, teensy-weensy pup and ended up at KSPCA. TNR Trust has now taken her in to give her the care and attention she needs.

From left to right: Lady, Dudu and Berry upon arrival at TNR Trust

From left to right: Lady, Dudu and Berry upon arrival at TNR Trust

Dudu is about 3.5 months old and really looked like a stick insect when she came in. But that does not prevent her from dishing out some puppy love!

She is a happy-go-lucky puppy who is well-socialized. She loves playing with other dogs and running off with their toys. She is a very lively little dog and as she will never be bigger than about 8kg, she can be easily kept in an apartment.

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Being in an apartment doesn’t mean you cannot have a pet! As long as your landlord/lady agrees with you having a pet, there are plenty of ways to enrich your furry friend’s life while living in a flat: taking them on lunch dates to dog-friendly places, going for a walk, buying/making them a new toy or simply spending time with them.

Are you not allowed to have pets? Maybe you should then consider becoming a Kennel Hand Volunteer for TNR Trust! You will get to socialise with the dogs/cats currently in foster homes, go for walks with them and give them some basic obedience.  Click HERE for the form to fill in and  make a difference in their lives.

Lucky: the muse of artists

Remember Lucky the lucky dog? (Click HERE for Lucky’s background story) This little guy was found abandoned in Karura Forest last year and found his furever home with a happy new owner.

TNR Volunteers went to pay these cool dudes a house visit to make sure Lucky was settling in all right. Nelson was full of praise of Lucky and Lucky? Well, just check out the happy-looking dog on the picture! 

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Some of our volunteers do house visits after an animal gets adopted through TNR Trust. We perform this extra service a few weeks after the adoption to make sure that the animal and his/her new family are compatible and that the animal has settled in well.

In the meantime, Lucky even got his portrait taken by the talented artist Leo Mativo. If you would like to get a portrait of your pet(s) and support TNR Trust at the same time, please send us an email on admin@tnrtrust.org !

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Rabies: the facts, symptoms and treatment

Rabies vaccinations

FACTS

  • Rabies has the highest case fatality rate of any infectious disease.
  • Rabies is 100% preventable.
  • Rabies is a disease of ALL MAMMALS (including humans)
  • Rabies is mainly transmitted from one animal to another through the bite of a rabid animal

PREVENTION

  • Practice responsible animal ownership: annual vaccination of your animals against rabies (Ksh 100 for 1 vaccin)
  • A healthy animal makes a healthy owner.
TNR Trust Rabies Vaccination Campaign in Kiambu County

TNR Trust Rabies Vaccination Campaign in Kiambu County

CLINICAL SIGNS

The clinical signs of Rabies involve typically Central Nervous System (CNS) disturbance. The disease has 3 phases that are different from each other depending on the stage and severity of CNS damage. The clinical picture however might be different from one species to another.

CATTLE:
  • A continuous bellowing which may continue intermittently until shortly before death
  • In lactating animals, milk production ceases abruptly
  • the animal is alert (the eyes and ears follow sound and movement).
  • Attack or pursue other animals and people.
  • Exhibiting difficulty in swallowing and fears water (hydrophobia).

NB: Cattle handlers and owners will almost always attempt to determine the cause of excessive salivation therefore exposing themselves to the virus.

Given some of the clinical signs are seen in cattle, veterinary intervention should be sought immediately.

DOGS “mad dog syndrome”
  • Become irritable and will attack with the slightest provocation.
  • Posture and expression is one of alertness and anxiety with pupils dilated
  • Noise may invite an attack.
  • May lose caution and fear of other animals and people.

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HORSES / DONKEYS:
  • Show evidence of distress and extreme agitation.
  • These signs accompanied by rolling may be misinterpreted as colic.

TREATMENT

“FIRST AID”

The action(s) taken immediately after the bite by a suspected rabid animal determines the chances of survival of the victim.

  • Wash bite wound with soap and water
  • Apply iodine on wound where possible
  • SEEK MEDICAL TREATMENT AS SOON AS POSSIBLE
MEDICAL TREATMENT
  • Wound care
  • Local infiltration with hyper-immune rabies globulin and
  • Post exposure prophylaxis with an anti-rabies vaccine that is repeated up to 4 times.

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REFERENCES

https://www.facebook.com/Acuvetkenya/

 

TNR Trust’s wonderful “FAILED FOSTERS”

Blitzen was found on the street as a tiny dehydrated and malnourished pup.

Lucy had been hanging out with security guards at a barrier for quite some time, but as she did not have a permanent home, the guards contacted TNR Trust.

TNR stands for “Trap, Neuter and Release”. When we find dogs on the street, we ensure vaccination, sterilization/spay and a full check-up by the vet. Once all of this has been done, we release them back where we picked them up.

But sometimes the Release is not possible due to various circumstances. Blitzen was too small and sick to survive and needed to be monitored. Lucy was sleeping in an empty plot which was going to get a tenant, which meant she would be out on the streets. That is why TNR Trust decided to take them on board and find foster homes for them.

Volunteering as a TNR foster family is a great alternative for many expat families who love dogs (or cats) but whose circumstances are not entirely stable enough to adopt one.

For example:

  • Families who don’t if they will have enough living space at their next post
  • Families who cannot afford transporting their pets abroad
  • Families who are only here for a short period of time

But sometimes, the most wonderful thing happens, and that is when we have “Failed Fosters”. A dog (or cat) would go to their foster family and win over the hearts of the members of the family. This was the case for Blitzen and Lucy. Both went to separate foster homes where each of them settled in nicely. They got along with all members of the house, whether they were humans or animals.

And as we all know: more often than we think, the dog choses its owner, not the other way around 🙂

TNR Trust is currently URGENTLY looking for foster families so we can help more dogs (and cats) that cannot be released again. If you chose to become a foster family, the TNR Trust community of volunteers will give you as much support as possible.

If you would like to know more about volunteering as a foster family, please click HERE.

Why you should consider adopting an older dog

It appears many people prefer adopting a puppy over an older dog on the belief that they will bond better with the puppy. Sure an older dog that has been in rescue will probably have a bit of baggage (who doesn’t), but in most cases, their past will not inhibit their ability to develop an emotional bond with a human.

Berry is another KSPCA – TNR TRUST collaboration: she came from an abusive home where she was completely neglected and ended up at KSPCA. TNR Trust has now taken her in to give her the attention she needs.

From left to right: Lady, Dudu and Berry upon arrival at TNR Trust

From left to right: Lady, Dudu and Berry upon arrival at TNR Trust

Even though Berry had been abused, she is still of a very sweet nature. She can get very excited seeing a visitor in her kennel and is currently learning that she does not need to jump to get the visitor’s attention. And she sure loves all the attention she gets: getting scratched behind the ear, searching for cuddles and treats and is eager to please.

Berry had beautiful jet-black fur (hence the name (Black)Berry) and is about 3 years old. Berry is spayed already, which saves you lots of trouble and money. As she is lively and energetic, she needs space to run around and someone who will take her on her much-loved walks. She is friendly with other dogs and can go to any home with children of 8 years and above

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You might think: “3 years already, isn’t she a bit old?” Let’s get one thing straight first: old dogs CAN learn new tricks! After being neglected, Berry is learning some basic obedience behaviour from our volunteers. She still gets a bit too excited when she gets a visitor, but together with the volunteers, she is making good strides towards calming herself down.

Aside from that, there are numerous reasons why you should consider adopting an older dog:

  • They won’t chew your shoes and furniture like puppies
  • They are more independent
  • They are house-trained much faster (if they are not already house-trained)

For starters, be as predictable as possible. Older dogs that have come with “baggage” (neglected, abused, abandoned, …) might have had their trust in humans broken and it is up to you to rebuild this trust. Berry is currently learning this as well through TNR Trust and its volunteers.

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TNR Trust at EAKC Championship Dog Show

On 12 and 13 May 2018, TNR Trust (in collaboration with KSPCA) manned a hospitality tent at the 164th EAKC Championship Dog Show at the EAKC Show Grounds, Nairobi

We showcased what we do and what our future goals are. As we put much value to education, we also provided some material for the littlest of visitors, as children are the future of this world.

 

Can you resist these puppy eyes?! – Up for Adoption

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Havana used to be a shy puppy, but has blossomed to a lovebug! She loves cuddles, tug-of-war and following humans around her foster house. She enjoys walking around the garden and meticulously does the security checks with guards.

At only 2 months old, we can already see that Havana is a born guard dog and cuddler. With a bit of puppy training and socialization, she will make a great companion and a sweet dog

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Alert and Aware

Indoor dogs vs Outdoor Dogs: Snoopy will opt for indoor any time!

Snoopy came to TNR Trust in 2016 with Christmas at our doorstep. We quickly realized he was a lovely lapdop and a Jack Russel in disguise. He was already about 8 years when he was dropped at a vet for treatment and his owner never returned. He was in KSPCA and through our collaboration, Snoopy ended up in a TNR Foster family.

His incredible new owner recently sent us this picture. Snoopy turned into a privileged dog, with nightly bed access and unlimited snuggles.

How we love happy endings!

Years ago, keeping your dog inside with you wasn’t common. Back then, owners considered dogs as protectors — a mate, but not part of the family. Fast forward to 2018 and some dogs are not only sleeping indoors and spending time with the family, they are also making their way into our beds. So what changed? Pet psychologist Dr Joanne Righetti says it could be because we now consider them as part of the family unit.

What are the benefits of indoor dogs?

When dogs spend time with us inside, there are some great benefits for both us and our pooches.

  • They are always close when we need someone to talk to or to touch.
  • They become part of the family and our children (if we have them) benefit from having a companion to nurture and tell their secrets to.
  • We can more easily see when our pets are sick or their behaviourhas changed and can seek help.
  • They alert us to anyone who is approaching our homes (and for those who want a guard dog — there is more chance of them protecting what is in your home rather than simply protecting your backyard).
  • We know where they are at all times so we can stop any misbehaviour.
  • There are even healthbenefits such as having fewer allergies when you grow up with pets.
  • They vacuum up all our crumbs!

What are the risks?

While the benefits of having a dog greatly outweigh the risks, there are some hazards to think about before opening that doggy door:

  • There are disease risks of having a dog close to us as zoonotic diseases that can be transferred from animal to human and vice versa. These risks are small, however, and probably far outweighed by the benefits.
  • We could potentially encounter our dog’s aggressive tendencies, perhaps challenging you for the sofa or taking your children’s toys. Obviously dogs need to be managed adequately and help found when any danger is present.
  • Toilet trainingis a must; otherwise you may find puddles on your favourite rug.
  • Other risks include tripping over your dog or not having a place on the sofa to sit!

What’s best for the dog?

Everyone should have a choice when it comes to the rules of the house, including working out what makes your pup comfortable. If humans don’t want to sleep with their dog on the bed or in the bedroom, they shouldn’t have to. The same applies to the dog. Most dogs will choose to sleep near their owner. They have more restless sleep than us and may get too warm next to us.

Some dogs, which spend a great deal of time in close proximity to their owners, will go on to develop separation anxiety — where they fret when left alone. Some dogs do not exhibit this condition so we don’t really know why some do and some don’t yet. Owners can make sure they spend some time apart from their dog, leaving them home alone or even leaving them in the room alone for a minute or two. This will help their dog learn to cope with being alone, especially if they are left with a toy or a treat to occupy them.

Dr Righetti believes the bond is strongest when owners live in close proximity to their dog. “If you don’t wish your dog to be indoors, perhaps you should spend more time outside. If this is unacceptable, then perhaps a different kind of pet would suit you better,” she says.

REFERENCES

https://www.dogslife.com.au/dog-news/dog-training/indoor-vs-outdoor-dogs

WOULD YOU LIKE TO ADOPT ME?

WE STILL NEED A HOME!

We have some beautiful rescues who need loving homes.

Please email admin@tnrtrust.org if you are interested in adopting any one of our fantastic furry friends!


Contact: TNR Trust Nairobi via:
Carla 0733 739 708 (sms) or Hanne 0703 358 975 
Email: admin@tnrtrust.org

TNR Trust requires an approved adoption contract, a donation of 8000 ksh to help cover vaccinations/food and a requisite follow-up home visit.

New owners must commit to spaying/neutering


DORA

Dora and Farah,: both love treats!

Dora and Farah,: both love treats!

DORA foster parent extraordinaire!
Dora is very special in her endearing behaviour towards any newcomers who are often nervous or depressed on arrival. She greets everyone in the morning when they go out in the yard -large and small, cats and dogs. She plays with all the dogs until everyone is exhausted.

She LOVES playing with the bigger dogs, but is just as good playing by herself with a toy. In the house she is calm. She is good on the leash. She is is fine with children too. She must be with another medium size dog so she sheds her energy.

She is a very gentle dog but an excellent guard dog too. She is spayed and micro chipped and 1 year old. She deserves her own family. Would you like to be the lucky one?


FARAH 

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Farah, our pretty queen  was a street dog, but she doesn’t think that is her real calling! She loves being with people and will sit and give you a paw for more attention.

At 45cm at the shoulder she is a good fit for people in an apartment. She is very friendly  with all dogs and cats. She is spayed and about 3 years old.

She would be an ideal companion for both senior people and families with children 8 years and above.


PACO

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A special adopter wanted

Paco is a beautiful little dog who didn’t have the best start in life. He isn’t a ‘lap dog’ yet, but he is starting to enjoy the idea of it. He has learned that people can be okay. He enjoys walks and loves to play with his fellow fosters. He is 10 months old and neutered. Paco would like to go to a ‘calm home environment’ and no small children. He needs a  patient and understanding owner, who is experienced with shy dogs. A confident dog as a companion will be ideal. An apartment or house with a small garden will work well.


MALAIKA

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Adopt a three-legged dog? Why would you want to do that?

Malaika finds that 3 or 4 legs doesn’t make any difference. She loves to play with other dogs and toys. She likes to chase the Hadeda ibises as she is very agile.

She have been quite fearful of people because she was in pain for 4 months and people chased her away. But since her arrival at TNR Trust, she started to enjoy the company of humans and dogs and learned a lot.

An experienced dog owner would be ideal.


HAVANA

20180504 Havana 3 optimzed.jpgHavana used to be a shy puppy, but has blossomed to a lovebug! She loves cuddles, tug-of-war and following humans around her foster house. She enjoys walking around the garden and meticulously does the security checks with guards.

At only 2 months old, we can already see that Havana is a born guard dog and cuddler. With a bit of puppy training and socialization, she will make a great companion and a sweet dog


MAX

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Meet the gorgeous 5-months old Max. He was adopted from KSPCA but returned for barking at strangers. He is currently at a foster family awaiting adoption to a patient and loving family. All his vaccinations are up to date.

Who can resist this blue-eyed handsome boy?!


DUDU

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Dudu is a lively little dog. At 3kg and 3.5 months old, she will never be bigger than 8 kg. She is a happy and well socialized  girl who can easily be kept in an apartment.


BERRY

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Consider an adult dog when adopting: They won’t chew your shoes and furniture like puppies! They are more independent and – if not already – are house-trained much quicker.

Berry was confiscated from a home due to neglect. She is a very lively 3-year-old who is very keen to be in the right with you. She is learning not to jump when excited and loves going for walks. She needs space to run around as she is very active.

She is friendly with other dogs and can go to any home with children 8 yrs and above. She is already spayed (which saves her new adopter a lot of money!)


LADY

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Consider an adult dog when adopting: They won’t chew your shoes and furniture like puppies! They are more independent and – if not already – are house-trained much quicker.

Lady was confiscated from a home due to neglect. She is a very loving dog, about 6 years old. She has the softest fur! She is at times a bit shy, but with a loving home, this will pass soon. She can be in an apartment. 

She is friendly with other dogs and can go to any home with children 8 yrs and above. She is already spayed (which saves her new adopter a lot of money!)


TIGGY AND PUPS

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Meet the 9 puppers and their mum Tiggy. The puppies are 5-weeks old and staying with a foster family. They are healthy, socialized and will be ready for adoption in the next 3 weeks


TWINKLE

Professional lovebug

Professional lovebug

Can they get any more comfy? ;-)

Can they get any more comfy? 😉

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A professional snuggler

Twinkle was caught at City Park Estate where there is currently a HUGE cat problem. She is about 4 months old and currently staying with a foster family. Nervous in the beginning, but 48 hours later she became a gem. Now she has blossomed into a very affectionate kitten.

Twinkle needs to be closer to a human, someone kind and loving who can provide a nurturing home. She loves being cuddled and just wants to be held.