TNR Trust

!! BREAKING NEWS !!

Exciting things are happening here at TNR Trust!

We had our preliminary KVB (Kenya Vet Board) inspection of our Mobile Clinic. They were most encouraging and very impressed with our clinic.  We have also received a grant to cover the vets salary for a year, so it’s really, really the home stretch!

Mobile clinic (MOCKUP)

We still have some items to cover, some are required by the vet board and some are things left to fund. 

TNR Mobile Clinic - 26.jpgWhat we still need

  • Permit fees 60,000 ksh (required) 
  • Branding of Mobile Clinic with our logo
  • Laptop, printer and power bar
  • 3 tents,  (1 with mesh sides)  
  • Padded canvas covers for protecting our solar panels 
  • LP Gas autoclave, gas canisters, and ring
  • Ramp to be build for the entrance for carrying sedated animals
  • Rubber mats for ramp and exam tables
  • Tables and chairs for paperwork for admitting animals, paperwork 
  • Megaphone
  • Basins / stands for pre washing surgical drapes and hand washing
  • Ongoing printing of vaccination cards
  • First Aid kit for humans, required triangles and fire extinguisher 

Monetary donations or donations in kinds are also very welcome!

How to Donate

Email us on admin@tnrtrust.org for Donations in Kind

Click HERE for Donations of funds via Mpesa, Stripe, PayPal, etc. – any amount is welcome!

TNR Volunteer: KARANJA

We are so lucky to have dedicated volunteers who help socializing and healing our fosters. We asked several of them what motivates them.

Karanja, a university graduate, is up first:

Why do you volunteer with foster dogs?

Karanja: “I have always loved dogs. As I was inbetween jobs I didn’t want to be idle and giving my time to the fosters seemed a worthwhile pastime.” 

What do you “take home” from volunteering?

Karanja: “Patience. I used to give up easily if something didn’t work immediately. Malaika  (the white dog) who was very scared after a bad accident and amputation took 3 months before we could put a collar on. Sitting beside her and slowly gaining her trust taught this patience. It makes a difference in my interaction with people now too.”

What difference does your volunteering make to the dogs?

Karanja: “Wow! Where do I start, I can answer this question by using Malaika, one of my favorites.  When I came in the first day there was a sign on Malaika’s kennel which said: “she bites, don’t touch, no eye contact”. After learning how to get her socialised, it became clear that she has a beautiful personality. I mean, she has come from far: from not touching her to touching her nose only, to legs to petting her all over. I feel proud to have played a part in this major achievement. 

My volunteering I believe, makes a big difference to the dogs, because I’ve seen most of them make huge strides to being happy and adoptable. The training and well programmed instructions we follow has also been one of the other contributing factors to the success.

And what difference does your volunteering make to you?

As I learn and understand much about their behaviours, I get to understand myself even better and this makes me a better volunteer to the doggies every day.

How do you become a TNR Trust Volunteer?

If you are interested in becoming a volunteer, there are multiple areas at TNR Trust where we depend on the help of volunteers, which you can find HERE. Become a volunteer and make a difference! 

How can a dog become an effective Guard Dog?

Guard Dog in Rural Kenya

Let’s be realistic and not expect our dogs to shield us from armed thieves. The primary use of a guard dog is to bark when strangers are around and alert you so you can take action.

What NOT to do

Guard Dog in Rural Kenya

Guard Dog in Rural Kenya

First of all, it is ILLEGAL to keep a dog permanently chained or confined in a box.

A dog’s natural behaviour is to have periods of activity and rest throughout the day and night, just like humans do. A dog will sleep a certain amount of time and will then want to run and play, investigate the perimeters of his territory and mark his boundaries. If there are strangers, he sounds a warning by barking. He will also react to intruders who cross his marked boundaries, even if he is resting!

Just like people, dogs are mammals that feel a range of emotions, such as happiness, sadness, pain, fear and anger. They suffer when mistreated, sick or imprisoned.


What to do

To have an effective guard dog, his natural instincts must be respected and nurtured. Here’s how:

  1. Make Friends
    Get to know your guard dog, play with him and feed him, so that he will form a bond with you and recognize he is a member of your pack.
  2. Allow him to roam the Compound
    He will be able to mark his territory and get some exercise that will avoid boredom, depression and unpredictable behavior.
  3. Give him Company
    If you can afford it, keep more than one dog. He will have company when you are not around, which is important for a dog, as they are pack animals.
  4. Satisfy his Essential Needs
    Make sure he has all the basics he needs to be happy and healthy: sufficient food,fresh water and a proper sized shelter that keeps out the rain and the cold and allows for a toilet area away from his bed; just like humans, dogs hate soiling their sleeping area so keep his shelter clean at all times.

lucy

Have you found this useful? Do you know someone who can benefit from this information?

Please feel free to give them our free flyer – click  on GUARD DOGS: MYTH VS TRUTH

 

WOULD YOU LIKE TO ADOPT ME?

WE STILL NEED A HOME!

We have some beautiful rescues who need loving homes.

Please email admin@tnrtrust.org if you are interested in adopting any one of our fantastic furry friends!

For detailed information on the adoptable dogs and cats, and TNR’s Terms and Conditions, got to: 

Dogs for Adoption

Cats for Adoption

 

This Coming Tuesday: Family Fun Night!

Poster FFN

Click below for the Official Trailer of the movie:

Sasha: Before, during and now! A brave and gentle lady up for adoption

Sasha had been tied up with a very short leash to a tree. She had been left for days without food or water and her owner was not interested in her well-being. She was just an inch away from Death’s Door.

After a few weeks, Sasha went to a lovely foster family TNR Trust was able to find for her. We ensured she had access to a good shelter and environment so that she could get an immune system boost from being in the sun, sniffing around in the garden and doing some gently walks with a family that already had experience owning dogs. Sasha had to go through a lot of physical but also mental healing. 

 

The above shows the incredible road to recovery this strong but gentle lady had to walk. Malnourishment, ticks, fleas and neglect did not stop her from becoming a fantastic dog.

Below are some of the great character traits which make her a perfect candidate for being your new dog:

  • Born January 2017
  • Very calm and loves attention.
  • She is looking for a forever, loving and permanent home.
  • She would be much more confident and play more in a family that has a dog.
  • She is good with cats and approved for family with 8 Years & older children.

 

Interested? Please email admin@tnrtrust.org to adopt the wonderful Sasha!

REFERENCES:

TNR Trust Emergency: When we found Sasha

Sasha: back from the brink of death

This Coming Tuesday: Family Fun Night!

Poster FFN

Click below for the Official Trailer of the movie:

GUARD DOGS: Would you defend your keeper who confines you in a box without a toilet for 12 hours a day?

Guard Dog in Rural Kenya

Let’s be realistic and not expect our dogs to shield us from armed thieves. The primary use of a guard dog is to bark when strangers are around and alert you so you can take action.

Guard Dog in Rural Kenya

Guard Dog in Rural Kenya

First of all, it is ILLEGAL to keep a dog permanently chained or confined in a box.

A dog’s natural behaviour is to have periods of activity and rest throughout the day and night, just like humans do. A dog will sleep a certain amount of time and will then want to run and play, investigate the perimeters of his territory and mark his boundaries. If there are strangers, he sounds a warning by barking. He will also react to intruders who cross his marked boundaries, even if he is resting!

Just like people, dogs are mammals that feel a range of emotions, such as happiness, sadness, pain, fear and anger. They suffer when mistreated, sick or imprisoned.


RESULTS OF CONFINING A DOG

Confining your dog in a box or small shelter without a toilet for 12 hours every day can often result in untold suffering of the dog and angry owners as the dog is seen as unwilling to ‘perform his job’. Often the results are:

1. Frustrated and unpredictable behaviour

  • A dog that is unable to mark territory will be scared and insecure.
  • A dog which has ‘rested’ all day will be hyperactive and unpredictable.

2. Depression and unhappiness because the dog:

  • Is lying in his own dirt.
  • Doesn’t know his pack (family) and is therefore unable to bond.
  • Lacks interaction and affection. He is lonely and bored.

3. Curtailed instincts and a lack of (or bad) training can result in a dangerous dog and can lead to:

  • Death or injury of a person or other animal
  • Death of the dog (euthanasia)
  • Getting a new dog and restarting the same cycle

lucy

Have you found this useful? Do you know someone who can benefit from this information?

Please feel free to give them our free flyer – click  on GUARD DOGS: MYTH VS TRUTH

 

WOULD YOU LIKE TO ADOPT ME?

WE STILL NEED A HOME!

We have some beautiful rescues who need loving homes.

Please email admin@tnrtrust.org if you are interested in adopting any one of our fantastic furry friends!

For detailed information on the adoptable dogs and cats, and TNR’s Terms and Conditions, got to: 

Dogs for Adoption

Cats for Adoption

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

Want to support TNR Trust while having fun? Go check out our upcoming events!!

14 Aug 2018: Family Fun Night

16 Sept 2018: TNR Picnic